An Evening With Denise Kiernan

Join Friends, the Knox County Public Library, Union Ave Books, and the East Tennessee Historical Society for an evening with best-selling author Denise Kiernan on Thursday, October 5, at the East Tennessee History Center. A reception will be held at 6 p.m.; at 7 p.m., Kiernan will speak about and sign copies of her latest book, The Last Castle: The Epic Story of Love, Loss, and American Royalty in the Nation’s Largest Home.

Tickets for this event are $10 each and are available for purchase online, at Union Ave Books, and at the Friends @ Rothrock Used Book Shop. Ticket holders may purchase copies of The Last Castle at the event at a discount of 10%.

In The Last Castle, Kiernan takes readers on a journey through the Gilded Age as she tells the true story behind Biltmore House, the largest home in America, and the struggles of those who lived there. She describes the lives of George, Edith, and Cornelia Vanderbilt in a tale that spans world wars, financial crises, and great tragedy.

Denise Kiernan is an author, journalist, and producer. Her last book, The Girls of Atomic City, was a New York Times, Los Angeles Times, and NPR bestseller. She lives in North Carolina.

Follow Denise Kiernan on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.


Advance Praise for The Last Castle

“Well-researched and captivating.” — Meryl Gordon, author of Bunny Mellon: The Life of an American Style Legend

“A soaring and gorgeous American story.” — Karen Abbott, author of Liar, Temptress, Soldier, Spy 

“A true tale of American excess, generosity, and perseverance.” — Bill Dedman, author of Empty Mansions

“A great history that has motivated me to make another trip to Asheville! Loved it!” — Stephanie Crowe, Page and Palette, Fairhope, AL, for the American Booksellers Association’s October 2017 Indie Next List


Event Sponsors

 

 

 

 

Media representatives and bloggers: Please contact us for more information about this and other Friends-sponsored events.

Denise Kiernan’s photo by Treadshots.com.

 

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSaveSaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSaveSaveSave